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working on a deal and nothing is locked down yet. we will talk more about the fiscal cliff this morning on "the washington journal." what tax deductions would you give up as part of a solution to the deficit problems? here are the numbers to call. for republicans, 202-585-3881. for democrats, 202-585-3880. for independents, 202-585-3882. you can also find us online. send us a tweet, twitter.com/c- spanwj. find a son facebook and weigh in there. at journal@c- span.org. "the christian science monitor," asked what we would be willing to give up. "americans would be willing to give up the tax deduction for charitable giving over other popular tax breaks." host: let's take a look at the results of this poll. 25% said that they would be willing to give up the charitable giving tax deduction. almost the same amount said it would be willing to give up their deduction for state taxes. 19% said they would be willing to give up host: we would like to hear what deduction you would give up. you can weigh in on our facebook page, there's a poll set up where you can tell us specifically which interest
on the fiscal cliff. this morning "washington journal" talk to a business representative about his take on the negotiations. host: let's begin with what is business forward, how did it come about? guest: is simple mission. our job is to make it easier for business leaders in the country who care about policy issues but did not have a washington office or a lobbyist, to speak about the issues of public policy. host: is this a brand-new organization? who is involved? >> we have been around 3 1/2 years, supported by some of the biggest companies of the world, with business leaders are in the country. we go out to small business owners, entrepreneurs, venture capitalist to get them involved in policy-making. what we do is we bring administration officials, members of congress, governors out to cities around the country to be briefings with business leaders. what we also do is bring the business leaders to washington. we tell them how to grow jobs and accelerate. host: what did the business leaders say to the president and how did it come about? guest: we have been doing this for a year, bri
it be ok if doing so sent us over the fiscal cliff? give us a call this morning. you can also catch up with us on all of your favorite social media websites. a very good morning to you. i want to begin with the question of compromise or sticking to principle. this is a question a gallup organization asked in a recent poll. it found 62% of americans would like to see the federal government leaders compromise on an agreement to avoid the fiscal cliff budget measures set to go into effect next month. more than twice the 25% who want leaders to stick to their principles. a majority of all party groups favor compromise. here is the breakdown from the gallup organization. 71% of democrats say they want a compromise bursa's 21% who say the party should stick to their principles. among republicans 55% one compromise. 35% say stick to your principles. the gallup poll also found americans are more optimistic and pessimistic that an agreement will be reached before the deadline. 58% say it is a very or somewhat likely leaders will find a solution. 39% say it is not likely. democrats are much more
the process. host: democrats line and we're looking at the fiscal cliff, go ahead. caller: good morning. i want to know why we keep talking about social security and medicare? why are we not talking about ssi and medicaid? that is where the problem really lies because they have not paid into the program. social security and medicare. if we want to fix the situation, we need to cut to that plus all these charitable contributions. we've got people spending money for christmas so why are we not able to have money in the economy? guest: on the medicare aside -- this is a very important issue were one needs a lot of public a lot -- a lot of public education about the numbers and the reality. the gap between peril taxes paid in and premiums paid into medicare and spending going out his $3 billion per year. that program is a big part of the problem. it is also true of medicaid and ssi, i think they should all be looked at carefully we have sold this section to the american public that they pay a dime into a program, they deserve all the benefits. the gap between what you pay into medicare and whe
with fiscal cliff reverberating in my brain and i can see politicians playing the very game that you alluded to there on jay leno and it is a game for them but for other people, it's a very real thing. and the economy at the moment is completely stagnant waiting for something to happen. you've been in a position of very negative government shutdown with president clinton and a very positive, where you and he in the second term got together, got stuff done and as you saw, a surplus in the economy. so you know what the reality of these debates are like and what it's likely to be going on behind closed doors. what is the way through this and how is this likely, in your expert opinion, to be resolved? >> first of all, i think it took the very tough two closings of the federal government, one for six days, the other for 21 days, in order to get to a point where we were able to negotiate seriously to get welfare reform which was vetoed twice and then signed, and then to get four consecutive balanced budgets which was a pretty substantial accomplishment. the only time in your lifetime we've had fou
. a joint economic committee hearing on the fiscal cliff. and shaun donovan discusses. ? morning, the national journal on the u.s. economy and a poll on the middle class. live coverage begins at 8:30 a.m. eastern on c-span 2. in the senate today, harry reid and mitch mcconnell went back and forth on fiscal cliff issues. there is part of their exchange. >> yesterday afternoon, i came to the floor and offered president obama's proposal on the fiscal cliff to show that neither he nor democrats in congress are acting in good faith in these negotiations. with just a few weeks ago before a potentially entirely avoidable blow to the economy, the president proposed a plan the members of his own party will even vote for. he is not interested in a balanced agreement, not particularly interested in avoiding the fiscal cliff, and clearly not interested at all in cutting any spending. with the president is really in, as we learned just yesterday, is getting as much taxpayer money as he can, first by raising taxes on small businesses who he believes are making too much money, and then on every
of the so-called fiscal cliff. on this morning's "washington journal," we'll look at the expiring unemployment benefits. our first guest is josh boak of "the fiscal times," then we have a roundtable. "washington journal" is live every day on c-span at 7:00 a.m. eastern. >> the supreme court will look at what was passed in 2008 by a majority of 6-3, i believe, and they're going to say that is precedent. >> and what is -- and indiana had a voter i.d. >> we talk about fact. they decided on the indiana case, it was constitutional for them to establish i.d. they did not say that all of those states -- >> correct. they talked about indiana. let me finish though, because you misrepresented what i said. >> no, you're misrepresenting -- >> hold on, hold on, hold on. >> this is the law of the land. >> and when i hear these accusations that black people, voter i.d. laws, you know, disproportionately affect minorities -- it implies to me that somehow we have something missing in our brain, we're lesser. to me, if white americans can get i.d.'s to vote and go through all the processes to follo
this morning after closing higher yesterday. gains were limited because of fiscal cliff concerns with no major progress out of washington. >> we're going to get the november jobs report at 8:30 a.m. eastern this morning. a survey forecasts 8% unemployment. that would be ticking up. 77,000 jobs added. a lot slower growth we have seen for much of this year. october 171,000 jobs were added then. it's likely hurricane sandy affected these numbers. they studied after hurricane katrina and the numbers were revise revised because it was too difficult for them to collect the data during and after the storm. in today's report we'll be watching four sectors. manufacturing, retail, leisure and hospitally and temporary help industries. mark sandy said aside from the storm, the job market turned in a good performance during the month. this is impressive given by the uncertainty of the presidential election. businesses are holding firm in their hiring and firing decisions. another unusual factor in the numbers, the layoffs and strikes at hostess. those could also affect the numbers. hostess filed for bankru
yesterday but gains were limited because of fiscal cliff concerns. >> we'll be hearing that until it's fixed. the november jobs report is released at 8:30 a.m. eastern today. economists forecast 8% unemployment, ticking up from 7.9% in october. 77,000 jobs added which is a lot slower growth than was anticipated. you have to go back to the summer to see growth that small. it's likely that superstorm sandy skewed the numbers, perhaps dramatically. economists at deutsche bank expect only 25,000 jobs added after they studied the hurricane effe effects on jobs. it was difficult for the labor department to collect data during and after that storm. in today's report, we'll watch four sectors hardest hit by the storm, manufacturing, retail, leisure and hospitality and temporary help industries. mark sandy said aside from the storm the job market turned in a good performance for the month. this simpreis impressive given uncertainty created by the presidential election and the fast-approaching fiscal cliff. except for sandy, jobs would have been doing better, and sandy is seen as a temporary factor. >
on the fiscal cliff. here's the wall street journal -- but then here's the "washington times this morning with their deadline -- headline -- so those are two headlines on house speaker john boehner and how he is doing in the fiscal cliff tops. headline is the president and the speaker both press each other. so that the latest in the back and forth on the fiscal cliff talks. the polls out, this is one from gallup. and the new york post shows this poll -- back to our topic, our question, do you support or oppose right-to-work laws? paul in utica, michigan, democrat. caller: i live in suburban detroit. i am a retired union worker, not automotive, by the way. i don't think my union is a thug in any way, but i think it's a sad day for the state of michigan. if the workers in this country cannot look to michigan like they always have, for a decent pay, and i think that is where we are headed, i just think it is a sad day. all the people who voted for these republicans, they are going to get what they asked for. this is what is going on here. i really sad about it. host: the car czar for michiga
cliff. good to see you this morning. welcome again to the program. and we welcome your calls at 1-866-55-press. in other big news, the supreme court has decided to hear two cases on marriage equality but why even bother to hold a hearing? hey, there's no doubt about it. under the constitution, it is wrong to discriminate against anybody for any reason. so, of course, gays and lesbians have every right under the constitution to marry each other. there is no doubt about it. we'll talk more about that today and a whole lot of other issues but first, we get the latest. here she is with today's current news update, lisa ferguson standing by in our studios in los angeles. hi lisa, good morning. >> hey bill. good morning everyone. nothing on the president's public schedule today. he just has his usual briefing in the oval office followed by lunch with the vice president. the first lady will be visiting the children's national medical center in d.c. and reading to hundreds of kids there. the department of housing and
on the fiscal cliff. a gloomy commentary this morning. expectations are getting narrow. grand bargains are out and the idea of maybe the fallback position is pass a simple tax bill like the one the senate had. the simple bill here. you have tax cuts for middle class but not for people over 250,000. you have dividends and capital gains going to 23.8%. that's the senate bill. and that's it. you leave out estate tax and leave out payroll tax cut and unemployment extension and you leave that out. no delay in the sequestration. this is pretty thin gruel. this is what's tossed about and talked about today overall. is that enough to satisfy the markets? remember, the two requirements, got to be before the end of the year and got to be substantive. before the end of the year but that doesn't sound substantive to me. i think there will be disappointments if that's all we get. did you see china? remember the bidder complaints two weeks ago. no efforts from chinese leadership to talk about the economy next year. now it's happening. we have another big move up in chinese mainland stocks today. up over 1%.
on the fiscal cliff, a focus this morning on the expiring tax provisions. host: today we're looking at the issue of tax extenders or tax incentives for business and individuals. and joining us in this discussion is sam goldfarb, who is a tax writer for c.q. roll call. what are tax extenders? >> well, they're temporary tax breaks. that's basically i think the most basic definition and some people are kind of concerned that the entire tax code is turning into one big tax extendser. so where do you really define it? but i think traditionally they're considered to be these pretty small provisions, narrowly targeted at specific types of businesses. some of them do apply to individuals as well. >> so why are they temporary? >> that's a good question. i think a lot of people, including people in congress, say either they should be made permanent or they should be eliminated altogether. but they're temporary because it's easier to pass that way. it looks like it costs less. usually they keep on being ex tended and extended. so so in effect they're almost permanent. host: we're going to look at some of t
. president obama is begin talking his fiscal cliff plans today. he will be on a conference call from the white house with a bi-partisan group of mayors and community leaders. the group will focus on how to prevent taxes from going up from middle class americans along with finding ways to grow the economy and reduce the deficit. turning to syria this morning, president obama is now stepping up pressure on bashar asaad with his official recognition of syria's opposition group. here with an interview with barbara walters. >> we have made a decision that the syrian opposition coalition is inclusive enough is reflective and representative enough of the syrian population that we consider them the legitimate representative of the syrian people in opposition to the outside regime. >> again, that's come from an exclusive interview yesterday with abc's barn with a walters. u.s. security officials are monitoring syria in case asad will use chemical weapons against his own people. other world leaders are expected to recognize the opposition. they say they will not ar
with this. why aren't you for going over the fiscal cliff? i heard you yesterday saying it would be catastrophic, but let me read you estimates. we go over the cliff, we suddenly have -- we're basically taking in as much money as we're spending over a five-year period. yes, the economy is in bad shape in 2013 but by 2018 we'd have a debt to gdp ratio of 1.1%. isn't this simpson-bowles on steroids? >> you know, it's no different than what happened over in the uk, in my opinion. they had a similar proposal to what we proposed with dollar revenue and $3 worth of spending cuts. they had a cost benefit analysis they did on all the spending programs, they raised the retirement age. they slowed the rate of growth of health care and they tried to get to balance in four or five years. and we thought at the time the debt was too much too quick that amount of austerity would really, you know, lead to a recession. that's why we had as our number one priority in our program that we didn't want to do anything to disrupt a very fragile economic recovery, so we phased ours in. if you do that and
approach to dealing with the fiscal cliff. now, this morning, mr. president, i listened to speaker boehner where he said the ball is in the president's court. i couldn't disagree more with the speaker of the house. and i think it's important to point out that since we've been working on trying to deal with this deficit issue, we have already agreed to over a trillion dollars of cuts in spending. it's in discretionary domestic spending, some of the most challenging areas that affects our most vulnerable people. we've implemented that. this is since the recommendations of the simpson-bowles commission came out. we took action. we imposed caps on discretionary dome spending. our federal work force has been through years, a couple years of pay freezes. we've seen programs that have been cut back on the support that they give people who need help. so we've already contributed on the spending side. is it enough? no. do we need to do more? absolutely. but we've done that. the next piece that must be done is the revenue piece. you can't have a balanced approach unless you have the revenues. smeen
. >> the longer the white house slow walks this discussion the closer our economy gets to the fiscal cliff and the more american jobs are placed in jeopardy. >> good morning the president has said on daily basis that we should be passing a balanced plan, but what we hear from the president is continuing only discussion on one side of the ledger, it has always been about tax rates increases, and nothing about spending, and we insist to say, look, there president, let's talk about a balanced plan, but where are your specifics on the spending cuts? even his own advisers say that any kind of agreement we come to has to deal with the prime drivers of our deficit, which is the spending and, particularly the healthcare entitlement programs. we ask the president to please sit down with us and be specific and let's get that balanced plan. you know, it's interesting that the senate has passed a bill that is a bill calling for increased revenues of $850 billion. the president continues to say, support that bill, pass that bill. well how is that the case when he continues to say, we also need $1.4 tri
a 39.6%. that's the washington post this morning. below that, governors say the fiscal cliff would hurt their states' economies. several governors met at the white house yesterday and with political leaders to say something needs to be done or their economies and on the state level will be heard. -- be hurt. let's go to walter in new jersey, independent caller. good morning. caller: good morning. i don't know what's wrong with these people, because they have to come to some kind of agreement. the gop has to give ground, taxes wouldybody's go up just to save 2%. it just does not cut it. it is a bad move politically and bad for the country. host: polloi in johnsonville, virginia. -- floyd. caller: i was thinking about the fiscal cliff. i don't think that's the problem at. the problem is when we fell off the moral cliff. our president said gay marriage was ok. and america killing so many babies. side,e get back on god's everything else will take care of itself. that's the way it is. a guy said it seemed like christians are down and out. let me tell you, christians are the happiest people t
that was wasted in the fiscal cliff discussions, but the market sure isn't trading that way. how come? >> good question. with us today is david darst. what do you reckon, david? how come? >> i think you got the four cs. you got consumer confidence. you've got the china situation looking a little better. you've got consumer credit looking better, mandy. finally, take liberty with that fourth c, house prices. they're hanging in there. that's been one thing. on the other hand, you have a deceleration going on this quarter, mandy. our best guess is it's going to come in at about 0.8%. first quarter, 0.9%. >> what are you talking about, gdp? >> on gdp. the second quarter, 1.2%. you're seeing a deceleration here. this is basically e quill librium. it's not just the fiscal cliff, mandy, that's causing the market to do this seesaw action. >> we highlighted yesterday how the german and french markets hit 52-week highs yesterday. we're not close to that. we hit our highs in september and haven't looked back. are we being held back by the fiscal cliff? >> just like business people, investors are waiting
cautious as u.s. leaders agreed to reach a budget deal to avoid the fiscal cliff. tokyo's nikkei gained a fraction while hong kong's hang seng added a quarter percent. >>> this week the federal reserve is expected to announce a new bond-buying program aimed at lowering interest rates. if it works, it might soften the blow if the nation goes over the fiscal cliff. fed chair ben bernanke has said if a budget deal can't be reached, there's little the central bank can do to offset the shock of those spending increases and tax cuts. >>> a strong sales report from mcdonald's offset wall street's worries about the fiscal cliff negotiations. the dow added 15 points while the nasdaq gained 9 points. >>> hsbc is paying a record $1.9 billion to settle a federal and state money laundering probe. the british bank was under investigation for allegedly transferring billions of dollars on behalf of iran which is under international sanctions. hsbc is also alleged to have laundered money from mexican drug cartels. under the terms of the settlement, the bank will avoid criminal prosecution if it meets ce
on the so-called fiscal cliff. he spoke to reporters for about five minutes. >> good morning. this is not a proper support because there is no progress to report. when it comes to the fiscal cliff, the white house has wasted another week. eight days ago, secretary brightener came here to offer a geithner pena to offer a plan. four days ago, we offered a proposal based on testimony of president clinton gaming former chief of staff. there has been a counter offer from the white house. reports indicate that the president has adopted a deliberate strategy to slow walk our economy to the edge of the fiscal cliff. instead of reforming the tax code, the president wants to raise tax rates. if the president get the tax hikes he wanted, we would continue to see trillion-dollar deficits for as far as the eye can see. washington has a spinning not a revenue problem. if the president does not agree with our proposal, he is obligated to offer a plan of his own, a plan that can pass both chambers of the congress. we are ready to talk to the president about a plan. >> you spoke with the pres
been agreed upon in the fiscal cliff talks, not to discuss the details. many look at this bipartisan silence and see an encouraging sign but white house and congressional sources tell me that while the atmosphere around these talks is positive between the president and speaker john boehner, when it gets to the underlying details, progress is maddeningly slow. president obama telephoned senate majority leader harry reid monday while rob nabors huddled for a second day in a row aide to speaker john boehner. no discernible progress toward breaking the fiscal cliff stalemate. mr. obama left that drama behind and told supporters in suburban detroit the fiscal cliff is serious business. >> if congress doesn't act soon, meaning in the next few weeks, starting on january 1st, everybody's going to see their income taxes go up. >> reporter: boehner and house republicans want to preserve all the bush era tax rates due to expire at year's end, shielding everyone from a tax increase. mr. obama wants to raise them for households earning more than $250,000 a year. he has so far resisted gop demands
the fiscal cliff and like what they see from the jobs report this morning. >> my goodness. that's optimism there. can you talk to me a little more about this job market shrinking and that maybe why the unemployment rate dropped? >> two surveys that the government takes, household survey where they call thos thousands of people at home and ask, are you working? that's the number that gives us the unemployment rate. they also talked to thousands and thousands of companies and they say how many jobs do you have? how many jobs have you added? that's how you get that net job creation number up 146,000. when the government calls people up and they say i'm not working or i've dropped out of the labor market or whatever, you can see just how big the labor market is. we know that there are some, i think, 300,000 some people who have dropped out of the labor market. they've either dropped out. they could be retiring or they could drop out because they're a two income household and now they're a one income household. they are not going to look anymore, decided maybe they'll look next year. you can ge
as the fiscal cliff take effect. bloomberg government hosted a discussion this morning with the top democrat on the house budget committee, chris van hollen as well as republican senator bob corker and senator mark warner. at 9:00 eastern, president obama and house spear jaub boehner and spoke about the fiscal cliff today. republicans might be willing to agree to higher tax rates on the wealthy in january. house speaker calling on the obama administration to respond to the republicans' deficit proposal. president obama is at 9:00 eastern followed by speaker boehner. >> this weekend on c-span 3's american history tv, follow harry truman's eldest grandson to japan. >> everybody has their own view what happened and i don't want to argue survival to anyone in japan about the history. we're past that. and my whole purpose for being here is to listen to the living and to do what i can. >> sunday at 9:00 p.m. eastern on c-span 3. >> the supreme court will look at what was passed in 2008 by a majority of 6-3 i believe and going to say that is precedent. and indiana had a -- >> they decided on the in
republican bob corker and other members of congress talking about this fiscal cliff. hosted by bloomberg government and the lloyd. this is about an hour. -- and deloitte. this is about an hour. >> good morning. i'm the head of bloomberg government. thank you for joining us today, and thank you to deloitte for partnering with us in this event. when we launched bloomberg government just about two years ago, we had the aspiration of creating a one-stop shop, with data, tools, news, and analysis to help government affairs and government sales professionals make better and faster decisions. we went a long way toward achieving that aspiration. a big part of it is conversations on the important issues that face our nation today, particularly at the intersection of business and government. today's discussion on the fiscal cliff clearly meets that. we are honored to have such a thoughtful panel. senator mark warner, senator bob corker, congressman chris van hollen, governor tim pawlenty, who is currently president and ceo of the financial services roundtable. moderating our discussion today is al
this discussion, the closer our economy gets to the fiscal cliff and the more american jobs are placed in jeopardy. >> good morning. lings -- the president said on a daily basis that we should be passing a balance plan. but we continue to hear only discussion on one side of the ledger. it's always been about tax rates increases and nothing about spending. we insist, let's talk about a balanced plan, where are your proposals for spending cuts. even his advisors say any agreement we come to has to include entitlement programs. we ask the president, please, sit down and be specific with us. let's get that balanced plan. it's interesting the senate passed a bill. the president continues to say support that bill, pass that bill. how is that the case when he continues to say we also need $1.4 trillion in additional new revenues. there's an inconsistency here. let's stop playing gapes. we want to be here for the american people and we want to make sure that we get a balanced solution so that we can start focusing on the one thing that we have seemed to have forgotten, and that is, it's about jobs and the
, too. >> caller: i'm a little offtoppic from the fiscal cliff but i think i can bring us back. >> stephanie: all right. >> caller: there was a shooting on an indian reservation a couple of days ago. five people were left dead. a shooting was -- has happened in oregon. the media keeps hyping up the fiscal cliff and they actually had a report on cnn where they were showing this woman blathering about how she's going to lose her unemployment and everything and i feel like there seems to be a tie-in between the economy, what's going on and this constant rampage. i'm wondering what at point is our government going to speak about it. i'm not one to condone removing all guns. we need to have a conversation. >> stephanie: also, i think everybody's going a little crazy around the holidays. i think there are a lot of factors right now. everybody i know is -- we're having mutual bitch session all day on the phone. 17 minutes after the hour. kids, i don't know what we would do without carbonite here at the "the stephanie mille
of congress. >> good morning. >> going home, guys. see you later. >> aid for state, considering the fiscal cliff and this budget crisis we're in right now? >> heading home now, guys. not taking questions today. >> heading home now, he says. story's very personal for one teenager. back home, who faces the impact of superstorm sandy everywhere he turns. he saved his family when that storm hit. he lost his home. and his school. but he hasn't lost his spirit. poppy harlow spent a day with ryan panetta in the broad channel neighborhood in new york. this is queens. take a look. >> reporter: the sun isn't up at breakfast time for the panettas. how tired are you? >> very. >> reporter: they're living in a borrowed one-bedroom apartment with their parents. how long is your commute to school now? >> it feels like two hours. >> reporter: what did it used to be? >> 15 minutes. >> reporter: wow. 6:30 a.m. and at the door. a long car ride. >> have a good day. >> a bus to the temporary school. ps-13. >> unreal now how much life has changed. trying to make the best of it. >> reporter: he's an eighth grade
. another republican apparently willing to agree with tax hikes to get a deal on the fiscal cliff. that is the case now. what do republicans get in return? senator lindsey graham is live on that. martha: looks like a beautiful morning everywhere, doesn't it. new reaction as details are now emerging in yet another nfl football tragedy. this time a crash that killed a dallas cowboy player and left another player charged with manslaughter this morning. >> i think everyone in our organization who knew him is completely numb and has been numb the last couple days. football is a game of emotion. a lot of different emotions circulating. somehow how some way, we have to process it all and understand that life is different than football and we had a job to do today gressiv, and they're them. yes. but they're here. yes. are you...? there? yes. no. are you them? i'm me. but those rates are for... them. so them are here. yes! you want to run through it again? no, i'm good. you got it? yes. rates for us and them -- now that's progressive. call or click today. music: "make someone happy"
: the republican leader. mr. mcconnell: with the fiscal cliff fast approaching, i feel the need to point out something this morning that's perfectly obvious to most americans but which democrats in washington still don't seem to grasp. i'm referring to the fact that any solution to our spending and debt problem has to involve cuts to out-of-control washington spending. i know that might sound obvious to most people but for all the president's talk about the need for a balanced approach, the truth is he and his democratic allies simply refused to be pinned down on any spending cuts. americans overwhelmingly support some level of cuts to government spending as part of a plan to cut the federal deficit. yet, the president will not commit to it. he refuses to lead on the issue. the president seems to think if all he talks about are taxes and that's all reporters write about, somehow the rest of us will magically forget that government spending is completely out of control and that he himself has been insisting on balance. a couple of weeks ago we saw his plan. after four straight trillion-dollar
the fiscal cliff. this included chris van hollen. also, senators mark warner and bob corker, a republican from tennessee. this is one hour. >> good morning. i'm the head of bloomberg government. thank you for joining us today, and thank you to deloitte for partnering with us in this event. when we launched bloomberg government just about two years ago, we had the aspiration of creating a one-stop shop, with data, tools, news, and analysis to help government affairs and government sales professionals make better and faster decisions. we went a long way toward achieving that aspiration. a big part of it is conversations on the important issues that face our nation today, particularly at the intersection of business and government. today's discussion on the fiscal cliff clearly meets that. we are honored to have such a thoughtful panel. senator mark warner, senator bob corker, congressman chris van hollen, governor tim pawlenty, who is currently president and ceo of the financial services roundtable. moderating our discussion today is al hunt. we always love having al over here. he really pu
"/abc poll of handling of fiscal cliff negotiations, obama, 47% approve, 46% disapprove. boehner, 24% approve. 54% disapprove. i would say, the republican party continues to have a branding problem. >> there is. >> or a disintegrating problem in washington. >> it is a branding problem that was born of chaos in the primary process that continues. there is a great "politico" article that actually talks about the republican problem with branding. and talks about -- >> it's a great piece. >> have you seen this? >> yeah. >> the republican party has a branding problem. these are researchers that say -- we asked 22, 23 different topics, whether americans related more to the democratic party or the republican party. 22 of the 23, they appeal more to democrats. >> yeah. >> it is a generalized, massive branding problem over what's happened nationally over the past year. >> except in the south. >> the piece, in part, points out that unlike people who sit around here, most people, normal people out there in america react emotionally to politics when they hear phrases, they react emotionally. does this re
:30 eastern. you can see the house live when they return here on c-span. in the meantime while fiscal cliff negotiations continue, we hosted a roundtable discussion about the debt talks and domestic program cuts on this morning's "washington journal." can host: isabel sawhim and james capretta. mr. capretta, let me begin with you. are these sequester cuts devastating? guest: they would be deep cuts. 80% cut across the board is a very significant one-time cut for any program to sustain in the immediate year period. so they're not a good idea. would it be the end of the world? no. host: what do you mean by that? guest: there would be a downsizing of a lot of services across the government in terms of domestic accounts. so there would be fewer services being provided. there would be reduce in federal employees. some grant programs would take a haircut of 5%, 10%. so there would be some downsizing of the services that are provided by the federal government. but the economy would go on and the government would go on and the public would still continue to get by and large serviced. host: can agen
moments, a discussion of house spending cuts in the so-called fiscal cliff. in a little less than an hour, more about the fiscal cliff with republican representative tom cole from oklahoma. then the head of fema testifies on capitol hill about the government's response to hurricane sandy. and later, senate debate on the u.n. treaty for the disabled. ♪ ♪ >> this weekend on c-span3's american history tv, follow harry truman easeleddest grandson to hiroshima as the city prepared to mark the bombing of the city in 1945. >> you know, everybody has their own view what happened, and i, i don't, i don't want to argue survival with anyone in japan about the history. i think we're past that. my whole purpose for being here is to listen, to honor the dead, to listen to the living and to see -- to do what i can to see this doesn't happen again. >> clifton truman daniel will join us sunday at 9 p.m. eastern on c-span3. >> now, a discussion of how the military and national security might be affected by spending cuts scheduled to take effect the first of the year. part of the so-called fiscal cliff.
their two plans to avoid the fiscal cliff. boehner says while he considers himself a positive guy he is not convinced an agreement is imminent. >> i was born with a glass half full. i remain the most optimistic person in this town. but we've got some serious differences. >> that's an understatement. the congressional campaign committee is launching a new set of radio and tv ads going after 21 tea party republicans in the house standing in the way of extending the middle class tax cuts. here is an example of the dramatic tv spot after california congressman gary miller. you that holiday season, if you make only one phone call, send only one e-mail, tell congressman gary miller don't drive us off the cliff! >> not bad. the president has used the phrase holding the middle class hostage when he talks about republicans who want to protect the rich at the expense of everyone else so the ads direct people to the web site g.o.p. hostage takers.com. where they aim to collect a half a million signatures in support of a hou
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